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Stuff I Like

97,346 notes

asaaf00:

Hayao Miyazaki talking about his passion for animation while seeing the world through his fascinating career. From the documentary: The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness (2013)

(via mccoyblood)

68 notes

sagansense:

In a recent article via Motherboard | Vice - ‘Big Data vs The Sixth Great Extinction Event’ - species’ extinction rates are discussed, addressing the recent study published in Science which reveals that the current extinction rate is now 1,000 times the ‘background rate’ or, what it would have been if human civilization wasn’t destroying the ecosystem through overfishing, deforestation, habitat destruction, global warming…this list is long.
You can read it all HERE, but whether you know it or not, we’re living in what has been dubbed The Sixth Great Extinction Event — which is not a scare tactic. This is quite serious, and not a cause for concern, but a deafening siren.
Our future is at stake. Not the planet, but the species which inhabit it and permit the ecosystem (which we’re included and to which provides for us) to thrive and survive.
Although not exactly “pushing back” on massive globalization by human suffocation civilization, big data is permitting better access to large amounts of information at a faster rate than ever before, through the means of online databases, crowdsourcing, apps, and new hard/software.
From the article:

“When combined with data on land-use change and the species observations of millions of amateur citizen scientists, they are increasingly allowing closer monitoring of the planet’s biodiversity and threats to it. For our success to continue, however, we need to support the expansion of these technologies and develop even more powerful technologies for the future.” — Duke University’s Stuart L. Pimm
Big data, in other words, is becoming more of a force in conservation.
Databases like TimeTree, Global Biodiversity Information Facility, the Ocean Biogeographic Information System, the Tree of Life, and the granddaddy, the digitized version of the IUCN’s Red List of Threatened Species, are becoming increasingly compatible, and scientists and citizens are getting better at sharing information across them.


So no, big data and the advancements we’re making regarding technological progress and management of data are not the solution, but they are certainly assisting our efforts to illuminate what politicians and governments seem to be completely blind to.

sagansense:

In a recent article via Motherboard | Vice - ‘Big Data vs The Sixth Great Extinction Event’ - species’ extinction rates are discussed, addressing the recent study published in Science which reveals that the current extinction rate is now 1,000 times the ‘background rate’ or, what it would have been if human civilization wasn’t destroying the ecosystem through overfishing, deforestation, habitat destruction, global warming…this list is long.

You can read it all HERE, but whether you know it or not, we’re living in what has been dubbed The Sixth Great Extinction Event — which is not a scare tactic. This is quite serious, and not a cause for concern, but a deafening siren.

Our future is at stake. Not the planet, but the species which inhabit it and permit the ecosystem (which we’re included and to which provides for us) to thrive and survive.

Although not exactly “pushing back” on massive globalization by human suffocation civilization, big data is permitting better access to large amounts of information at a faster rate than ever before, through the means of online databases, crowdsourcing, apps, and new hard/software.

From the article:

When combined with data on land-use change and the species observations of millions of amateur citizen scientists, they are increasingly allowing closer monitoring of the planet’s biodiversity and threats to it. For our success to continue, however, we need to support the expansion of these technologies and develop even more powerful technologies for the future. — Duke University’s Stuart L. Pimm

Big data, in other words, is becoming more of a force in conservation.

Databases like TimeTree, Global Biodiversity Information Facility, the Ocean Biogeographic Information System, the Tree of Life, and the granddaddy, the digitized version of the IUCN’s Red List of Threatened Species, are becoming increasingly compatible, and scientists and citizens are getting better at sharing information across them.

So no, big data and the advancements we’re making regarding technological progress and management of data are not the solution, but they are certainly assisting our efforts to illuminate what politicians and governments seem to be completely blind to.

(via starsaremymuse)